TEST: Face Masks and the Cardiorespiratory Response to Physical Activity in Health and Disease

TEST: Face Masks and the Cardiorespiratory Response to Physical Activity in Health and Disease

Member:

$200.00 USD

Non-member:

$250.00 USD

Provided by the American Thoracic Society
Release Date: September 16, 2022

Program Description

To minimize transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the novel coronavirus responsible for coronavirus disease (COVID-19), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization recommend wearing face masks in public. Some have expressed concern that these may affect the cardiopulmonary system by increasing the work of breathing, altering pulmonary gas exchange and increasing dyspnea, especially during physical activity.

These concerns have been derived largely from studies evaluating devices intentionally designed to severely affect respiratory mechanics and gas exchange. We review the literature on the effects of various face masks and respirators on the respiratory system during physical activity using data from several models: cloth face coverings and surgical masks, N95 respirators, industrial respirators, and applied highly resistive or high–dead space respiratory loads. Overall, the available data suggest that although dyspnea may be increased and alter perceived effort with activity, the effects on work of breathing, blood gases, and other physiological parameters imposed by face masks during physical activity are small, often too small to be detected, even during very heavy exercise.

There is no current evidence to support sex-based or age-based differences in the physiological responses to exercise while wearing a face mask. Although the available data suggest that negative effects of using cloth or surgical face masks during physical activity in healthy individuals are negligible and unlikely to impact exercise tolerance significantly, for some individuals with severe cardiopulmonary disease, any added resistance and/or minor changes in blood gases may evoke considerably more dyspnea and, thus, affect exercise capacity.

Target Audience

Pulmonologists, critical care specialists, translational researchers, and clinicians

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, learners should be able to:

  • Describe the effects of face masks on the respiratory responses to exercise.
  • Predict the physiologic effects of face masks on healthy individuals.
  • Describe the potential physiologic effects of face masks in individuals with underlying respiratory disease.

Course summary

Available Credit:
1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit

ACCREDITATION STATEMENT

The American Thoracic Society is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Type Credit/Points Credit Designation Statement
AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™ 1.00 The American Thoracic Society designates this for a maximum of 1.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

DISCLOSURE DECLARATIONS

Article Authorship Disclosures (as submitted to the ATS prior to article publication date)

Susan R. Hopkins, M.D., Ph.D. (University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA) reported receiving grants from National Institutes of Health.

Paolo B. Dominelli, Ph.D. (University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada) reported receiving grants from National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

Christopher K. Davis, M.D., Ph.D. (University of California San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego, CA, USA) reported no relevant financial relationships.

Jordan A. Guenette, Ph.D. (University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) reported no relevant financial relationships.

Andrew M. Luks, M.D. (University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA) reported no relevant financial relationships.

Yannick Molgat-Seon, Ph.D. (The University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada) reported receiving grants from National Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

Rui Carlos Sá, Ph.D. (University of California at San Diego Health, La Jolla, CA, USA) reported receiving grants from National Institutes of Health and has been issued US patent 9,750,427.

A. William Sheel, Ph.D. (University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) reported receiving grants from National Sciences and Egineering Research Council.

Erik R. Swenson, M.D. (University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA) reported no relevant financial relationships.

Michael K. Stickland, Ph.D. (University of Albertia, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada) reported receiving grants from Canadian Institutes of Health Research and National Sciences and Engineering Research Council.

Off-Label Usage Disclosure

None

Disclosures of AnnalsATS CME Planners

The Annals of the American Thoracic Society (AnnalsATS) original research, commentaries, reviews, and educational content of interest to clinicians and clinical investigators in pediatric and adult pulmonary and sleep medicine and medical critical care. The scope of the journal encompasses content that is applicable to clinical practice, the formative and continuing education of clinical specialists, and the advancement of public health.

The publication of articles that meet these goals by itself is only one step in a multi-step process for the translation of evidence-based improvements in are to clinical practice. Testing for CME credit is designed to function as a next step in the process. This is accomplished through a series of questions written by the author(s) to test that readers have the tools needed to translate recommendations for diagnostic and therapeutic clinical care into clinical practice. Members of the AnnalsATS editorial board review these questions and edit these questions for clarity, educational content, and the quality of the evidence.

INSTRUCTIONS TO RECEIVE CREDIT

To receive credit for this journal article:

  1. Read the journal article. Keep track of how long it takes you to read it.
  2. Once you open the article, the Post-Test becomes available. After reading the article, answer the post-test questions. You must answer all questions correctly to earn credit. You may take the test as many times as you like.
  3. Once you pass the Post-Test, the Evaluation becomes available. Answer all the evaluation questions.
  4. Once you complete the evaluation, select the amount of credit to receive based on the time it took you to read the article.
  5. You can view, save and print your Certificate by pressing the Certificate button.
  6. To review the credits you've earned in this system and reprint certificates, go to the My Learning drop-down list. Then select Transcript.